Tuesday, 28 June 2016

The tiny Moorhen chicks on the Italian Garden pond can run over the surface of the algae, but when they stop they start to sink in.


The Mandarin family at the Vista are down to three ducklings. Their mother was looking after them attentively ...


... while Death sailed elegantly overhead.


In the Italian Garden, a gnat was about to meet its doom at the hands of a Blue-Tailed Damselfly.


It's becoming increasingly plain that the three smallest goslings of the combined Canada Goose family are Greylags. They are in a row at the back of this picture. Note their greyish-brown bills and legs, in contrast to the black ones of the two young Canadas at the front.


The Black Swan was near the Diana fountain, preening his splendid new ruffles.


This rabbit under the Henry Moore arch is not recollecting an acutely embarrassing experience. It's just grooming its face.


There was one young Grey Heron in each of the nests on the island -- this is the eastern one where two young were hatched. Hoarse cries came from the tree on the right, where a Carrion Crow was annoying the other one, probably the one seen flying in yesterday's photograph.


At the Dell restaurant, a Feral Pigeon had found a wonderful abundance of leftovers. After walking round the table and inspecting the salad, it settled on chips (as you would), and ate quite a lot of them before a waitress took the plates away.


A Jay in the leaf yard gave me an appraising look, expecting a peanut, which it got.


The male Little Owl came out to the front of his chestnut tree.


One of the owlets was in the shade of the other tree.


Update: Mike Meilack saw and photographed two Common Sandpipers on the dead willow tree in the Long Water next to the Italian Garden.

18 comments:

  1. Maybe Rabbit had just got word of the England-Iceland result? Or had finally realised the threat to environmental regulations from a Brexit? A little surprising the pigeon would avoid the salad, but maybe it had had negative conditioning from various dressings it didn't like. Jim n.L.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think the rabbit would have howled with laughter at the football result, as I did.

      Delete
    2. So I am not the only one who rejoices in the elimination of one's national football team? Spain just got sent home, and I couldn't be happier. How unpatriotic of me.

      Delete
    3. It gets the shouting over quicker.

      Delete
    4. One of many allegedly 'non-native' species fearing imminent deportation perhaps? I don't think environmental protection has done much for bunnies, EU or otherwise.

      Delete
  2. That Baby Moorhen is as close to walking on water as any vertebrate can. It ought to have more faith in its own flotability, although if even Saint Peter couldn't muster it, what is a poor baby Moorhen to do.

    That picture of the Gull is chilling, if very beautiful. Thank God we have the lovely new ruffles on the Black Swan to gladden us again.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If St Peter had kept going he too would have stayed up.

      Delete
    2. In light of Peter's negative buoyancy was Jesus demonstrating humorous tendencies in nominating him for 'Rock' duties?

      For serious water-walking abilities it's got to be the Northern Jacana:

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northern_jacana#/media/File:Northern_Jacana_Juvenile.jpg

      Delete
    3. Jacanas, like the Rallidae, cheat somewhat as they are treading water plants. I prefer certain displaying grebes and basilisks among vertebrates. Jim n.L.

      Delete
  3. Theology and birds,what a wonderful blog.

    ReplyDelete
  4. A propos of nothing, but going over old entries in a Spanish bird blog I found the following which I think all Coot fans in this blog will find amusing:

    A pair of brave Coots take on a Mute Swan and win:

    http://nosinmisprismaticos.blogspot.com.es/2014/07/territorio-ocupado.html

    ReplyDelete
  5. Rabbits are, historically, an import from the Levant (as a fur animal), and thus not entitled to be here, post-Brexeunt. (The hare is our only NATIVE lagomorph.) Alternatively, the poor beast, usually blasé about its surroundings, suddenly took a long hard look at the Henry Moore and responded entirely appropriately.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I thought rabbits were of Spanish origin. Maybe I was wrong, but certainly the name España comes via Latin from the Phoenician i-sh phannim, island of rabbits.

      Delete
  6. Do you have a collection of the black swan's discarded ruffles Ralph?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No, I never managed to find any of his moulted feathers. A pity.

      Delete
    2. That is a shame - I can imagine them forming a dramatic urban-indian headdress.

      Delete